New Diet Coke, even less is more

Diet soft drinks have always been about less. The new Diet Coke can is about more.

The new packaging is more fun, more sophisticated and a much more sensitive link to the brand’s unique and historic character.

Two trends are evident with this new packaging. First, iconic brands are beginning to recognize and celebrate their heritage. Some brands have done it with simplistic solutions like “throwback” replicas of old packaging. Some like Coke, have begun to genuinely identify and distill the most basic visual foundations of their brand heritage, and reintroduce packaging that is historically sensitive but transformational.

Second, brand identities are getting simpler. In all categories, and with both branded and private label products, savvy marketers have begun to apply their heritage on the shelf with simpler, cleaner, and more compelling package design solutions.

Acknowledgments
Shown above is a photo of the new can, sent to me today, with the new look as it will be launched this Fall.

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About Richard Shear

designer, husband, teacher, blogger, father, athlete, author, historian Richard has over 25 years of brand identity and package design experience, with a wide range of clients such as Ahold, Coca-Cola, Hasbro, IBM, Johnson & Johnson, Pernod Ricard and Procter & Gamble. He began his career working with the legendary advertising art director, and AIGA Medalist, George Lois and the British design manager Clive Chajet. In his next design management position at Lippincott & Margulies, he worked with Walter Margulies learning the complex skills of global corporate identity. He then became Creative Director and Partner at Peterson & Blyth, one of the premier brand identity and package design firms of the time. He is a founding faculty member of the Masters in Branding Program at New York’s School of Visual Arts. He publishes the blog The Package Unseen, and has been a guest lecturer at colleges including FIT, Trinity College and Tyler School of Art. He is a graduate of the Tyler School of Art at Temple University. Richard is a Board member of the AIGA MetroNorth Chapter, past President of AIGA‘s Brand Design Association, President of the Package Design Council and a member of its Board of Directors. He is a member of USA Cycling and US Rowing, a nationally ranked masters bicycle racer, and a member of The Saugatuck Rowing Club, the 2010 Masters Club National Champion.
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7 Responses to New Diet Coke, even less is more

  1. I must simply agree with Richard keen observations. This is to “audience” in a way that
    actually compliments and rewards the consumption of the product itself. Most Diet Coke junkies
    I know reach for a can at least twice, if not three times a day. This design not only flerts with modern culture, it wraps around design history and gives it a hug.

    I’m getting a can today just to spin it around and see how it changes view and mood.

    Thanks for this worthy “signature moment” in pakage design Richard.

  2. really, it brings design driven by retro marketing to the whole new level.

  3. Simple and clean: great!

  4. I love this design; simple, modern and effective!

  5. Andy says:

    Ether the worlds IQ has risen over the past 20 years or we have sold out to the big brands in such a way that logos have become abstract art. Andy Warhole would be very happy.
    Great work

  6. Leah says:

    Packaging is quite simple and catchy. Very presentable.

  7. Pingback: Diet Coke & Package Design Blogs | Box Vox

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